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Garda Confidential No.: 1 800 666 111
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Frequently Asked Questions

General

Page Description Short 
How do I report a crime or a missing person? How do I report a crime or a missing person?
When do I call 999? When do I call 999?
Do I have to give my name if I ring 999 or my local Garda Station? Do I have to give my name if I ring 999 or my local Garda Station?
How can I report a noise complaint? How can I report a noise complaint?
How can I thank a member of An Garda Síochána? How can I thank a member of An Garda Síochána?
How do I complain about a member of An Garda Síochána? How do I complain about a member of An Garda Síochána?
I am a transition year student. Can I do work experience in An Garda Síochána? I am a transition year student. Can I do work experience in An Garda Síochána?
Where can I get information about domestic violence? Where can I get information about domestic violence?
I have lost my passport. What do I do next? I have lost my passport. What do I do next?
How many Garda Members are there? How many Garda Members are there?
How can I get old service records of a parent or grandparent who served in An Garda Síochána? How can I get old service records of a parent or grandparent who served in An Garda Síochána?
I am receiving unsolicited offensive e-mail. What should I do? I am receiving unsolicited offensive e-mail. What should I do?
Where can I go for advice on internet safety? Where can I go for advice on internet safety?
I am doing a college project. Where can I get crime statistics? I am doing a college project. Where can I get crime statistics?
How do I renew my GNIB card? How do I renew my GNIB card?
If I already have a firearms certificate, extended by the Garda Commissioner, can I apply for a new firearm certificate for an additional firearm during this extended period? If I already have a firearms certificate, extended by the Garda Commissioner, can I apply for a new firearm certificate for an additional firearm during this extended period?
If arrested, how long can I be detained for? If arrested, how long can I be detained for?
Does the Freedom of Information Act apply to An Garda Siochana? Does the Freedom of Information Act apply to An Garda Siochana?
Where do I get information on Exporting Firearms? Where do I get information on Exporting Firearms?
I am receiving suspected illegal content online. What should I do? I am receiving suspected illegal content online. What should I do?
I have seen what I suspect to be illegal content on the Internet. What should I do? I have seen what I suspect to be illegal content on the Internet. What should I do?
Who is Hotline.ie Who is Hotline.ie

 

Page Description Short 
How do I report a crime or a missing person?
How do I report a crime or a missing person?

To report a crime or a missing person you should ring your local Garda Station

  • Information about reporting a missing person is available in the Missing Persons Section
  • In the case of emergency ring 999.
  • To report an incident in confidence ring the Garda Confidential Telephone Number 1800 666 111.
When do I call 999?
When do I call 999?

You should call 999 or 112 in the case of an emergency. An emergency is any incident which requires an immediate Garda response. Examples of emergencies are:-

  • A danger to life
  • Risk of serious injury
  • Crime in progress or about to happen
  • Offender still at scene or has just left

In all other circumstances when reporting a crime you should contact your local Garda Station. You can find out details of your local Garda Station in our Station Directory. Anyone with information regarding a crime can also ring the Garda Confidential Telephone Number 1800 666 111. 

Contact details of your local Garda Station should be readily to hand in both your home and place of work, and on speed dial on your home and mobile phones. 

What happens when I call 112 or 999?

Remember when calling 112 (or 999), ‘stay calm, stay focused and stay on the line’.

When you call 112 or 999, please clearly state the emergency service you require. You may be required to give details such as your name, location and telephone number.

In all other circumstances when reporting a crime you should contact your local Garda Station. You can find out details of your local Garda Station in our Station Directory.

Anyone with information regarding a crime can also ring the Garda Confidential Telephone Number 1800 666 111.

Contact details of your local Garda Station should be readily to hand in both your home and place of work, and on speed dial on your home and mobile phones. 

 

 

Do I have to give my name if I ring 999 or my local Garda Station?
Do I have to give my name if I ring 999 or my local Garda Station?
Although it will assist the Gardaí if you provide as much information as possible, you do not have to give your name if you ring to report an incident. To speak to the Gardaí in complete confidence ring the Garda Confidential Telephone Number 1800 666 111.
How can I report a noise complaint?
How can I report a noise complaint?
If you would like to report a noise complaint immediately you can ring your local Garda Station. However persistent noise should ideally be referred to the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government. The Department of Environment website contains useful information about Neighbourhood/Domestic Noise pollution, faulty alarms, commercial and construction noise pollution and the Environmental Noise Regulations 2006.
How can I thank a member of An Garda Síochána?
How can I thank a member of An Garda Síochána?

The best way of thanking a member of An Garda Síochána is to write to the Superintendent in charge of the station to which the guard is attached.

 

You can ask a Garda for his or her name, Registered Number and Station at the time of the incident. If it is after the event and you do not have the Garda’s details, you can ring your local station for help in identifying him or her.

 

E-mail is not currently available at all Garda Stations.

How do I complain about a member of An Garda Síochána?
How do I complain about a member of An Garda Síochána?
If you would like to make a complaint about a member of An Garda Síochána you should contact the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission  or your local Garda Station.
I am a transition year student. Can I do work experience in An Garda Síochána?
I am a transition year student. Can I do work experience in An Garda Síochána?
There is huge demand for work placements with An Garda Síochána, with limited placements available. However where we can, we will try to accommodate requests for work experience. To enquire about the possibility of getting a placement, please contact your local Garda Superintendent. To find out who your local Garda Superintendent is please visit our Station Directory.
Where can I get information about domestic violence?
Where can I get information about domestic violence?
To find out how to go about issuing proceedings (e.g. safety order) please contact your local District Court Office. If you live in Dublin please contact the Dublin District Family Law Office, Dolphin House, East Essex Street, Dublin 2. Details of these offices are available at www.courts.ie, or you can ring the Courts Service on +00353 1 888 6000. You can also call your local Garda Station for assistance in this matter.
I have lost my passport. What do I do next?
I have lost my passport. What do I do next?

If you have lost your passport, or if it has been stolen, you should immediately report the loss to the Passport Office or to your nearest Irish Embassy or Consulate. To obtain a new passport you need to complete a passport application form [APS1 if resident in the State, APS2 if resident elsewhere]. This should be witnessed by a Member of An Garda Síochána if you are resident in the State or by one of the eligible witnesses listed on the APS2 form if you live elsewhere. For further information please visit the website of the Department of Foreign Affairs.

 

It is advisable to have a photocopy of your passport with you when travelling. This will greatly assist in getting an emergency passport if your passport is lost or stolen.

How many Garda Members are there?
How many Garda Members are there?

There are 12,954 members of An Garda Síochána. These are broken down per Rank as follows:  

Commissioner:    0
Deputy Commissioner:    1
Assistant Commissioner:    8
Chief Superintendent:    41
Superintendent:    143
Inspector:    262
Sergeant:    1,825
Garda:    10,674
Total:     12,954
 

Figures valid as on 31st May 2014.

How can I get old service records of a parent or grandparent who served in An Garda Síochána?
How can I get old service records of a parent or grandparent who served in An Garda Síochána?
Service Record details can be obtained from the Garda Museum and Archives Section, telephone +353 1 666 9998 or by e-mail to museum@garda.ie. Many service records for the Royal Irish Constabulary and the Dublin Metropolitan Police are also available.

 

I am receiving unsolicited offensive e-mail. What should I do?
I am receiving unsolicited offensive e-mail. What should I do?
You can report unsolicited offensive e-mail at www.hotline.ie. This service provides an anonymous facility for the public to report suspected illegal content encountered on the Internet, in a secure and confidential way. The Hotline, run by the Internet Service Providers Association of Ireland (ISPAI) since November 1999, is part financed by the European Commission’s Safer Internet Plus Programme. It is supervised by the Department of Justice, Office for Internet Safety, in cooperation with An Garda Síochána and is a member of INHOPE, the International Network of Hotlines.
Where can I go for advice on internet safety?
Where can I go for advice on internet safety?
You can find out about internet safety at www.makeITsecure.ie. This is an all Ireland website dedicated to Internet security and is sponsored by the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, the Northern Ireland Department of Finance and a number of key software companies including Microsoft, British Telecom, Eircom and Vodafone.
I am doing a college project. Where can I get crime statistics?
I am doing a college project. Where can I get crime statistics?
The Central Statistics Office is responsible for producing crime statistics and publishes them on its website.
How do I renew my GNIB card?
How do I renew my GNIB card?

For information on renewing your GNIB card and for other information relating to Immigration please visit our page about the Garda National Immigration Bureau

If I already have a firearms certificate, extended by the Garda Commissioner, can I apply for a new firearm certificate for an additional firearm during this extended period?
If I already have a firearms certificate, extended by the Garda Commissioner, can I apply for a new firearm certificate for an additional firearm during this extended period?

Yes. Any person (including existing firearm certificate holders) may apply for a new firearm certificate for a firearm (on form FCA1) under the new legislation which came into force on 1st August 2009.

 

For further FAQ's in relation to Firearms licensing, please see "Firearms Licensing" tab on left.

If arrested, how long can I be detained for?
If arrested, how long can I be detained for?
 This document is provided as general guidelines only. 

 
The document includes a summary of the following:

• Powers of detention
• Periods excluded in calculating the detention period
• Powers of arrest
• Powers of re-arrest
• Treatment of Persons in custody

N.B:

All legislation listed below is summarised and not intended to be used for any purpose other than for quick reference. For a more detailed view, the Acts themselves and any amendments, repeals and substitutions, should be consulted. Legal resources such as www.Irishstatutebook.ie may be useful. 


Powers of Detention


Section 4 – Criminal Justice Act 1984

24 Hours - Maximum Period of Detention
• 6 Hours – Granted by Member in Charge (MiC)
• 6 Hours – Extended by Superintendent
• 12 Hours – Extended by Chief  Superintendent

NB. Please note S4 CJA 1984 is a power of detention not a power of arrest. Powers of arrest are attained from other pieces of legislation, as outlined further on in this document

See Appendix 1, for reasons why the clock can be stopped during the period of detention


Section 30 – Offences Against the State Act 1939

72 Hours - Maximum Period of Detention
• 24 Hours – Granted by Arresting Member
• 24 Hours – Extended by Chief Superintendent
• 24 Hours – Application by Superintendent at the District Court

Usually involving firearms or explosives offences. Normally used for murder enquiry’s, and the investigation of terrorist / subversive offences.

See Appendix 1, for reasons why the clock can be stopped during the period of detention


Section 2 – Criminal Justice (Drug Trafficking) Act 1996

7 Days / 168 hours - Maximum Period of Detention
• 6 Hours – Granted by Member in Charge (MiC)
• 18 Hours – Extended by Superintendent
• 24 Hours – Extended by Chief Superintendent
• 72 Hours – Application by Chief Superintendent to District Court
• 48 Hours – Application by Chief Superintendent to District Court

Usually involving offences under the Misuse of Drugs Act Sec 15 or 15A, Possession for Sale or Supply. Other offences are on the schedule for this detention.

See Appendix 1, for reasons why the clock can be stopped during the period of detention


Section 42 Criminal Justice Act 1999

24 Hours - Maximum Period of Detention
• 6 Hours – Granted by Member in Charge (MiC)
• 6 Hours – Extended by Superintendent
• 12 Hours – Extended by Chief  Superintendent

Section 50 – Criminal Justice Act 2007


7 Days / 168 hours - Maximum Period of Detention
• 6 Hours – Granted by Member in Charge (MiC)
• 18 Hours – Extended by Superintendent
• 24 Hours – Extended by Chief Superintendent
• 72 Hours – Application by Chief Superintendent to District Court
• 48 Hours – Application by Chief Superintendent to District Court

To include the following offences;
• murder involving the use of a firearm or an explosive
• murder to which section 3 of the Criminal Justice Act 1990 applies [capital murder]
• an offence under section 15 of the Firearms Act 1925 (as substituted by section 42 of the Criminal Justice Act 2006) [possession of firearms or ammunition with intent to endanger life or cause serious injury to property]
• an offence under section 15 of the Non-Fatal Offences against the Person Act 1997 [false imprisonment] involving the use of a firearm
• organised crime offences of conspiracy ( Section 71) organised crime ( Section 72) and commission of offences for criminal organisation (Section 73) as set out in the Criminal Justice Act 2006.

See Appendix 1, for reasons why the clock can be stopped during the period of detention


Periods Excluded in calculating the detention period

Appendix 1 – Clock Stop During Detention

The clock may stop running in relation to the detention periods outlined above under Section 4 and Section 42 in the following situations:

If the Member In Charge (MiC) authorises suspension of questioning for a specified period between midnight and 8am to allow the detainee to rest, then that rest period will be excluded when calculating the period of detention.
If the person is detained under Section 4 CJA 1984 the prisoner must consent to the suspension of questioning.

If the detainee is in need of medical attention and is taken out of the Garda station the period that the detainee is absent from the station will be excluded when reckoning the period of detention.

Where detainee is taken to a court in connection with an application relating to the lawfulness of his detention, the time during which he is absent from the station for that purpose will be excluded when reckoning the period of detention.


Powers of Arrest

Statutes conferring a power of arrest

Numerous statutes create a power of arrest in relation to specific offences – these include (note that this is by no means an exhaustive list):

• Criminal Law Act 1997, s 4       
• Section 30 Offences Against the State Act 1939
• Misuse of Drugs Act 1977, s 25
• Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act 1994, s 24
• Firearms and Offensive Weapons Act 1990, s 14
• Criminal Damage Act 1991, s12

Note: Section 4 of the Criminal Law Act 1997 is the most widely used Power of Arrest. It covers any offence which carries a penalty on indictment of 5 years or more.

An arrestable offence is defined in section 2(1) of the Act as:
“an offence for which a person of full capacity and not previously convicted may, under or by virtue of any enactment or the common law, be punished by imprisonment for a term of five years or by a more severe penalty and includes an attempt to commit any such offence”

• Section 42 Criminal Justice Act 1999

Empowers a Judge of the District Court to authorise a member of An Garda Síochána to arrest a prisoner*, and take him to a Garda station for possible detention there, once such Judge is satisfied, by way of information supplied on oath by a Garda Superintendent or person of higher rank, that there are reasonable grounds to suspect that such prisoner has committed an offence other than that for which he has been imprisoned.

*("prisoner" means a person who is in prison on foot of a sentence of imprisonment, on committal awaiting trial, on remand or otherwise)


Powers to re-arrest

Section 10 Criminal Justice Act 1984

Gives the power to re-arrest on the authority of a justice of the District Court who is satisfied on information supplied on oath by a member of the Garda Síochána not below the rank of superintendent that further information has come to the knowledge of the Garda Síochána since the person's release as to his suspected participation in the offence for which his arrest is sought. A person arrested under that authority shall be dealt with pursuant to section 4.
A person may also be arrested for any offence for the purpose of charging him with that offence forthwith.


Treatment of Persons in Custody

Treatment of Persons in Custody Regulations

The treatment of persons in custody regulations are the regulations which cover a prisoners legal entitlement.

They are derived from Regulation 8, Criminal Justice Act 1984 (Treatment of Persons in Custody in Garda Síochána Stations) Regulations, 1987 and 2006.

A copy of these rights is supplied to all persons in custody on entering the Garda station when their details are entered in the Custody Record (C84), the form handed to the prisoner is the C72(S).

It outlines the following;
• Legal Advice
• Medical Treatment
• Telephone Calls and Personal Visits
• Searches
• Provision of Meals
• The taking of Photographs, Fingerprints and other bodily samples

Does the Freedom of Information Act apply to An Garda Siochana?
Does the Freedom of Information Act apply to An Garda Siochana?

An Garda Siochana is not a prescribed body under the Freedom of Information Act (Prescribed Bodies) Regulations 2006. In this regard Statutory Instrument No. 297 of 2006 refers.  This being the case the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 1997/2003 do not apply to An Garda Siochana; and, thus, requests under the Freedom of Information Act 1997/2003 cannot be acceded to.

Where do I get information on Exporting Firearms?
Where do I get information on Exporting Firearms?
All information regarding the requirements/information on exporting a firearm can be obtained on the Department of Justice and Equality website www.justice.ie
I am receiving suspected illegal content online. What should I do?
I am receiving suspected illegal content online. What should I do?
You can report suspected Child Pornography or Incitement to Hatred (such as racist hate speech) online by using the reporting form available at www.hotline.ie. This service provides an anonymous facility for the public to report suspected illegal content encountered on the Internet, in a secure and confidential way. The Hotline, run by the Internet Service Providers Association of Ireland (ISPAI) since November 1999, is part financed by the European Commission’s Safer Internet Plus Programme. It is supervised by the Department of Justice, Office for Internet Safety, in cooperation with An Garda Síochána and is a member of INHOPE, the International Network of Hotlines.

I have seen what I suspect to be illegal content on the Internet. What should I do?
I have seen what I suspect to be illegal content on the Internet. What should I do?
You can report suspected illegal content online by using the reporting form available at www.hotline.ie.  This service provides an anonymous facility for the public to report suspected illegal content encountered on the Internet, in a secure and confidential way. The Hotline, run by the Internet Service Providers Association of Ireland (ISPAI) since November 1999, is part financed by the European Commission’s Safer Internet Plus Programme. It is supervised by the Department of Justice, Office for Internet Safety, in cooperation with An Garda Síochána and is a member of INHOPE, the International Network of Hotlines.

Who is Hotline.ie
Who is Hotline.ie
The Hotline, run by the Internet Service Providers Association of Ireland (ISPAI) since November 1999, is part financed by the European Commission’s Safer Internet Plus Programme. It is supervised by the Department of Justice, Office for Internet Safety (OIS), in cooperation with An Garda Síochána and is a member of INHOPE, the International Network of Hotlines.